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20110705
20110705
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
about whether a blind eye was turnedat scotland yard -- turned at scotland yard. >> for more on the uproar and the culture surrounding the british tabloids, i am joined by a reporter from london. thank you for joining me. coming from this side of the atlantic, is this a uniquely british phenomenon? >> i think there is a different newspaper culture. the national enquirer in america is about as close as you will get to some of the tabloid tone that we have in our best-selling newspaper. if you imagine "the national enquirer" was the best-selling newspaper in america, you would understand the situation here. >> they come up with stories that sailed very close to the legal edge. >> they have a culture that says get results whatever the cost. in a situation where circulation is falling and there is a battle for readers, that pushes people ever closer to the legal line and the moral line -- the at the line of journalism, as we have seen with these latest "news of the world" allegations. hacking into the phone of a child murder victim. i do not think many people would be shocked, be
at a quarry in scotland. but, many as a matter of principle refused alternative service as well. and they were sent to prison. more than 6000 young englishman went to prison during the war. the largest number of people up to that point in time ever in prison for political reasons in a western democracy. they served their sentences in places like wandsworth prison in the photograph here, in southwest london. those that you can see stretched across the opening there is to prevent people from committing suicide. prison conditions were extremely harsh. prisoners lived under what was called the rule of silence, where you were not allowed to talk to your fellow prisoners. they found ways around it of course, tapping on cell walls and whispering to people and whatnot, but they lived several years under those conditions. the diet with terrible. there was a shortage of coal. the prisons were very cold. many people died in prison. so, i was fascinated by these war resisters. for the longest time, i could not figure out how, from a storytelling point of view, i was going to get the resisters and the gene
a blind eye was turned at scotland yard. >> for more on this uproar and the culture which surrounds the british tabloids, i spoke with a reporter from one the best of this as a result of a unique issue with british tabloid journalism. >> i think there is a different newspaper culture. the national enquirer in america is about as close as you are going to get to some of the tabloid tone that we have in our best selling newspapers. i suppose if you imagine the national enquirer was the best- selling newspaper in america, he would have the understanding of the state of journalism here. >> what are the pressures on reporters and editors to come up with stories like this and sail close to the legal wednesday to separate >> immense. -- close to the legal winds to do this. >> demands. we are in a situation or circulation is falling and there is a battle for readers. that pushes people ever closer to the legal line and the moral line and ethical line of journalism. as we have seen with these latest revelations, hacking into the phones of murder victims, a child murder victims, it's terrible
words, she'll be investigating herself. the police inquiry is continuing as well and scotland yard says there are more bombshell revelations to come. >> pelley: mark, do we know who started this hacking to begin with? >> it was a private investigator who was working for the "news of the world." he appears to have developed the system for hacking into the accounts but then various reporters-- many of them-- this was a long standing practice appeared to have done the reporting and the ferreting out of information that's appeared in the papers. >> pelley: thank you, mark. this story is amazing. a court case in southern india has led to an astounding discovery. a spectacular treasure inside a 500-year-old hindu temple. a local activist has accused administrators of the temple of mismanagement so an audit was ordered. it turned up at least $22 billion worth of gold and jewels. $22 billion. the police are now guarding the treasure around the clock. off the mexican coast, the search continues for seven missing americans. why rescuers think they may still be alive when we come back. my copd sym
girl later found dead by police. dan is in scotland yard with more on this. there is tremendous outcry on the breach of privacy. tell us what was behind this story? >> reporter: there has been an on going scandal on the so-called phone hacking. the example of journalists hacking into the cell phone messages of celebrities and even royals to get salacious stories. we thought this dated or started back in 2005 when prince williams' phone was hacked into, and certificaain stories found way into the press. a number have been forced to resign. now it has been revealed that those same journalists may have hacked into the cell phone of a young 13-year-old school girl just after she disappeared in 2002. much earlier than any of the other scandals. the suggestion is they were listening in to the frantic messages of family and friends of where she was. they deleted messages to make more room on the cell phone mail box, giving hope to her family she was still alive, when in fact she was killed by a serial killer. police headquarters have been a meeting place where they will be asked questions. >>
the support of all of our colleagues. on december 21st, 1988, pan am 103 exploded over lockerbie scotland. 12 years later, the individual who was convicted of conspiracy for planting the bomb that brought down the flight was sent to serve a life sentence in august of 2009, he was released on compassionate grounds by the scottish government who said he has less than three months to live today approaching two years he remains live and in tripoli. these families have been searching for justice and for answers for more than 20 years. and the rupture of the gadhafi government presents a real opportunity to learn who ordered the bombing. who collected the intelligence to carry out the plan? who made the bomb and in addition to the bomber who bears responsibility for this and other heinous attacks and who should be brought to justice so does three things. it requires the president to continue many investigative activities into the bombing of pam am 103 and other terrorist attacks attributed to the government. the president urged the transitional national council and any successor government of libya
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)